More Security Needed

AT THE TIME OF WRITING THIS, THE LAS VEGAS SHOOTING IS A FRESH WOUND. NOW KNOWN AS THE LARGEST MASS SHOOTING IN MODERN U.S. HISTORY, EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT EVENT AND HOTEL SECURITY, AND HOW THERE IS A HUGE NEED FOR MORE SECURITY AT THESE VENUES. ON OCTOBER 1, STEPHEN PADDOCK, A 64-YEAR-OLD MAN FROM MESQUITE, NEVADA, DECIDED TO FIRE INTO THE CROWD AT THE ROUTE 91 CONCERT FESTIVAL. 59 PEOPLE WERE KILLED AND MORE THAN 500 WERE INJURED, FOREVER CHANGING THE LIVES OF THOSE WHO WERE DIRECTLY AFFECTED BY THE CATASTROPHE— AND EVEN THOSE WHO WEREN’T.

Event security is now at the forefront of many minds across the world. I’ve even spoken to a few people, including close friends of mine, who said they are now worried about attending concerts for fear of a similar shooting to take place. And that fear is something we cannot let terrible, evil people like Paddock change our lives for the worse; we cannot live in fear. But, we can do something about it. Musicians, such as Lady Gaga, are even stepping into the discussion about making security better for their fans and for themselves and their crews.

An increase in security measures is a necessity; public concerts, sporting events and other events that could draw in large crowds need to do their best to protect everyone who is attending. More security officers, an increase in metal detectors and screening processes are just a few ways to help decrease the risks. Teams who have been trained to recognize potentially dangerous behavior is also another way to try and prevent these terrible tragedies.

My thoughts and prayers are with you, Vegas.

This article originally appeared in the November 2017 issue of Campus Security & Life Safety.

About the Author

Lindsay Page is the editor for Campus Security & Life Safety magazine, and the senior editor for Security Today.

Digital Edition

  • Campus Security & Life Safety Magazine - October 2018

    October 2018

    Featuring:

    • The Importance of Coordinated Communications
    • Technology and School Security
    • Invisible Protection
    • AI Comes to the Classroom

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