DHS Grant Available for School-Age Trauma Training

DHS Grant Available for School-Age Trauma Training

The Department of Homeland Security is offering school districts funding for student trauma training programs.

The Department of Homeland Security has issued a $1.8 million grant for schools to create a program providing "life saving trauma training to high school age students for mass casualty events," according to records found on grants.gov.

The DHS' Notice of Funding Opportunity explains that the agency is seeking to address trauma training for the high school-age communities.

"School-Age Trauma Training (SATT) is intended to establish a long-term, self-sustaining mechanism, to deliver free to the public, lifesaving trauma training to high school age students for mass casualty events," the DHS NOFO states. "The government expects the grantee to design, develop and implement a training capability."

DHS notes the number one cause of preventable death from trauma is uncontrolled bleeding. The SATT initiative is designed to "enhance a bystander's ability to take decisive, lifesaving action to assist victims with traumatic injures."

The effort is aimed at a board youth-based approach through public/private schools, not-for profit organizations, faith-based and other civic communities of interest.

The DHS decision to create funding opportunities for SATT comes in the wake of several school shootings on campuses in the United State. Officials have stated that several of the victims in the Parkland, Fla. shooting died as a result of excessive blood loss following traumatic injuries as first responders did not gain access to the building until 20 minutes after the shooting had occurred. 

About the Author

Sydny Shepard is the Executive Editor of Campus Security & Life Safety.

Digital Edition

  • Campus Security & Life Safety Magazine - August 2018

    August 2018

    Featuring:

    • How To Select The Best Mass Notification System For Your Campus
    • Why, Where and When To Retrofit
    • Four Tips For Developing Effective Campus Security
    • Three Pillars Of Visitor Management

    View This Issue