Indiana Schools Routinely Review School Security

Indiana Schools Routinely Review School Security

MSDWT submits its school safety plan yearly to the state of Indiana, as required by Indiana Administrative Code in order to receive accreditation. According to the district, its security procedures and plans “meet all legal requirements of the state of Indiana and take a multi-hazard approach to school safety.”

Washington Township schools in Indiana are serious about student safety on their campuses. The Metropolitan School District of Washington Township (MSDWT) said its security plans meet all legal requirements and are reviewed routinely in order to make changes to meet the highest standards.

MSDWT submits its school safety plan yearly to the state of Indiana, as required by Indiana Administrative Code in order to receive accreditation. According to the district, its security procedures and plans “meet all legal requirements of the state of Indiana and take a multi-hazard approach to school safety.”

“Our plans are routinely reviewed and edited each year to ensure that we are incorporating the best practices in school safety and security,” District spokeswoman Ellen Rogers said. 

The current MSDWT school safety plan was first developed in 2011 and implemented the following year, following the best practices from the Department of Homeland Security and the Office of Readiness and Emergency Management. The district said the plan was developed by its District Safety Committee, a multi-disciplinary team, and was created in collaboration and review with Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department, Indianapolis Fire Department and the City of Indianapolis’ Department of Homeland Security.

The district did not disclose details of its policies and procedures, citing Indiana Code that allows disclosure exceptions to ensure school safety plans and measures are secure. However, Rogers did tell RTV6 that the district employs seven school resource officers as part of its School Police Department.

“These officers are fully trained law enforcement and school resource officers, who are certified by the National Association of School Resource Officers and have various assignments,” Rogers said. “They also are (or about to be) certified as Indiana School Safety Specialists.”

Through the Governor’s metal detector program, the MDSWT secured 45 devices as part of its school safety toolkit. The district also uses a software database provided by the City of Indianapolis DHS to allow first responders to keep updated on school safety plans.

“We work collaboratively with IMPD, IFD, IEMS and DHS in any responses required by outside agencies,” Rogers said. 

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Jessica Davis is the Associate Content Editor for 1105 Media.

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