Man Pulls Gun on Winnipeg Security Guards While Being Escorted Out of Hospital

Man Pulls Gun on Winnipeg Security Guards While Being Escorted Out of Hospital

There was a violent disturbance involving two individuals Saturday in the Children’s Hospital at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg. As one of the individuals was being escorted out, he pulled a gun on the security guards.

As security guards were escorting out a man who was part of a violent disturbance Saturday in the Children’s Hospital at the Health Sciences Centre in Winnipeg, the man pulled a gun on the security guards.

There were two individuals involved in the disturbance, one of which was detained and one of which was escorted. The man who was escorted is the one who pulled the gun.

“Once outside the building at the 820 Sherbrook [St.] Loop, the person pulled out what appeared to be a firearm and pointed it at the security officers,” a spokesperson for Shared Health said in a statement to CBC news. “The suspect then ran off.”

After the suspect ran away, security guards locked down the area while Winnipeg police officers cleared the area. A suspect was identified using surveillance video, and police confirmed they received a report of a male possibly armed with a gun, but no arrests have been made.

Michelle Gawronsky, president of the Manitoba Government and General Employees’ Union said that while security guards have been dealing with rising violence the past few months, this incident was different.

“This incident was like no other,” Gawronsky said in a statement to CBC news. “This may be the first time that HSC security officers have had a gun pointed at them, though they have removed many guns and other weapons from people in the hospital.”

The Manitoba Government and General Employees’ Union has long said that security guards haven’t been given the authority or clear direction on what to do and when to intervene in violent situations. Following the incident, Gawronsky renewed a call for security officers to be granted enhanced legal status.

“[This would be] so they can do what they need to do, without fear of repercussions, to uphold safety in our hospitals,” Gawronsky said.

There have been initiatives introduced to health Sciences Centre recently to improve security, including limiting visiting times after-hours to the majority of hospital units, which dropped security incidents by 39 percent in December and 66 percent in January compared to the same months the previous year.

About the Author

Kaitlyn DeHaven is the Associate Content Editor for the Infrastructure Solutions Group at 1105 Media.

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