New York Law Allows School Districts to Install Cameras to Catch Drivers Not Stopping for Buses

New York Law Allows School Districts to Install Cameras to Catch Drivers Not Stopping for Buses

A new law allows school districts to install cameras on buses to catch drivers who do not stop when buses have red stop lights flashing.

School is back in session in New York, and drivers not only have to brave extended morning commutes but they also have to be aware of new safety laws pertaining to schools.

In an effort to reduce the amount of vehicles who illegally pass school buses that have red stop lights flashing, New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo passed a measure in August that allows school districts to install cameras to catch drivers passing.

Newsday reported the new law is a result of a study in April 2018 that revealed that 850 drivers across the state were ticketed in one day for passing buses, with hundreds more ignoring the flashing lights.

"No parent should ever have to worry that their child's bus ride to and from school is anything other than safe and easy," Cuomo said in a statement in August, adding, "By signing this measure into law, we are providing school districts the tools they need to hold reckless drivers accountable and advancing New York State's bold initiatives to keep our school children safe."

The first time a driver is caught, they can be fined between $250-$400 and a possible jail sentence of up to 30 days. The fine increases to $600-$750 with a second conviction within three years. A third conviction will carry a fine of $750 to $100 and a possible sentence of up to 180 days in jail, according to Newsday.

About the Author

Sherelle Black is a Content Editor for the Infrastructure Solutions Group at 1105 Media.

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