Auburn University Introduces Student IDs for Mobile Devices

Auburn University in Auburn, Ala., announced this week that it’s launching a mobile student ID card that can be used on compatible iPhones, Apple Watches or Android devices. The electronic version of the “Tiger Card” can be used in place of a traditional, plastic ID card to access campus buildings, purchase meals, do laundry and more. Once the mobile ID card is set up, users can simply present their mobile screen to an NFC-enabled device.

“We’re thrilled to launch contactless technology at Auburn this fall,” said Bobby R. Woodard, senior vice president for Student Affairs. “It’s something our students have wanted, and we have worked hard to bring the safest, most secure and most convenient method of accessing buildings and services to campus.”

Auburn partnered with technology provider CBORD and global access and security provider Allegion on the project. A user’s credentials can be remotely and instantly issued, revoked or reactivated, adding a level of security and fraud prevention to the technology.

“At Auburn, we strive to bring the best technologies to our students, and now we bring a sea of change to our identity solution with the mobile credential project,” said Kevin Watson, Student Affairs Technology director. “We’re certain our students will appreciate a quicker and safer way to use the Tiger Card from their phones as the program rolls out this fall.”

Students have already been granted access to the mobile campus ID program, and they have been provided with instructions on how to set it up on their device of choice.

“The campus card—whether it be traditional plastic or mobile—is the nucleus of a student’s daily routine. From accessing their residence hall and academic buildings to checking out library books, hitting the gym and eating at the dining commons—the student card is used often and everywhere,” said Jeff Koziol, PACS business development consultant at Allegion. “Auburn University’s upgrade to mobile credentials enhances the student experience with the various Schlage readers on campus, while providing a touchless scenario when interacting with the readers that is important during pandemic times. The mobile credentials can be distributed remotely on a self-service basis with control still being maintained by the campus, eliminating the need for frequent trips or long lines at a campus card office.”

About the Author

Matt Jones is senior editor of Spaces4Learning and Campus Security and Life Safety. He can be reached at MJones@1105media.com

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